Disclaimers for Rankings and Awards

Barron’s: According to Barron’s, “The formula [used] to rank advisors has three major components: assets managed, revenue produced and quality of the advisor’s practice. Investment returns are not a component of the rankings because an advisor’s returns are dictated largely by each client’s risk tolerance. The quality-of-practice component includes an evaluation of each advisor’s regulatory record.” The rankings are based on the universe of applications submitted to Barron’s. The selection process begins with a nomination and application provided to Barron’s. Principals of PagnatoKarp self-nominated the firm and submitted quantitative and qualitative information to Barron’s as requested. Barron’s reviewed and considered this information, which resulted in the rankings.

Financial Times: For RIAs to qualify for the FT 300, the Financial Times considered advisor AUM that had to be $300 million or more, asset growth, the company’s age, industry certifications of key employees, SEC compliance record and online accessibility. Neither the RIA firms nor their employees pay a fee to The Financial Times for inclusion in the FT 300.

Forbes: Developed by Shook Research, the 200-member ranking is based on overall quality of practice and an algorithm of qualitative and quantitative data received in nominations from over 11,000 professionals in the financial services industry, including banks, brokerages, custodians, insurance companies, clearing houses and registered investment advisers. Criteria includes client retention, industry experience, review of compliance records, firm nominations; as well as assets under management and revenue generated for their firms. Advisors must have a minimum of seven years of experience to be considered.

ThinkAdvisor: Candidates who pass the rigorous screens have served a minimum of 20 years in the industry, have acquired substantial assets under management, have demonstrated superior client service and have earned recognition from their peers and the broader community for the honor they reflect on their profession.

Virginia BPTW: Companies from across the state participate in a two-part survey process to determine the 100 Best Places to Work in Virginia. Part one examines each entrant company’s workplace policies, practices, benefits and demographics. Part two consists of an employee engagement and satisfaction survey. The combined scores from parts one and two determine the top companies. Best Companies Group manages the overall registration, evaluation and selection process.

Washingtonian: Survey of hundreds of area financial professionals. Fee-only advisors include certified financial planners who do not accept commissions or referral fees.

Washington Business Journal: Rankings were determined by Omaha, Nebraska-based Quantum Workplace and are based on each company’s score on an employee engagement survey. To qualify for the small company category, firms must have between 10 and 24 local employees in the Washington region. Quantum queries, evaluates and scores participating companies in categories ranging from team effectiveness, trust in senior leadership and alignment with company goals.